Gotham Knights’ System Requirements on PC Are Quite Demanding

Warner Bros. has released the PC specs for Gotham Knights, revealing some pretty demanding system requirements for the upcoming DC action game.

Gotham Knights’ Steam page now shows that users will need at least a GeForce RTX 2070 graphics card to play on high settings at 60fps, but only at 1080p resolution. For that graphical set up you’ll also need a CPU equivalent to or better than an Intel i7-10700K or Ryzen 5 5600X alongside 16GB of RAM. That’s a resonably steep demand for 1080p.

Gotham Knights minimum requirements were also shared, with users needing a GeForce GTX 1660 Ti or AMD Radeon RX 590 to run the game on low settings (but still at 60fps and 1080p). An Intel Core i5-9600K or AMD Ryzen 5 3600 equivalant CPU is also required alongside 8GB of RAM.

Warner Bros. didn’t reveal any system requirements for players who want to go above 1080p or 60fps, but the wait to find out won’t be long as Gotham Knights launches on October 21. However, based on the specs being demanded for 1080p, it would seem that players are going to need an Nvida RTX 30-series card or AMD equivilent for 1440p and above, and probably not the lower-end cards, either.

The announcement comes after Warner Bros. That the PlayStation 5 and Xbox Series versions of Gotham Knights will be capped at 30fps announced with no performance mode available.

“Due to the types of features we have in our game, like providing a fully untethered co-op experience in our highly detailed open-world, it’s not as straightforward as lowering the resolution and getting a higher FPS,” said Gotham Knights executive producer Fleur “Flaoua” Marty at the time. “For this reason, our game does not have a performance/quality toggle option and will run at 30fps on consoles.”

It appears, then, that Gotham Knights technical make up simply demands quite a lot of power, hence its 30fps cap on console and reasonably high-end spec requirements on PC.

In our final preview of the game, IGN said: “Gotham Knights is not an easy game to demo, and while [we] walked away from my hands-on time less than impressed with many aspects of combat, [we] still found [ourselves] interested in playing more.”

Ryan Dinsdale is an IGN freelancer. He’ll talk about The Witcher all day.

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